I strongly recommend Cathy as an interview coach. I found her training very helpful to me.

I am a scientist by training.  With strong credentials, I was able to get a lot of interviews. My friends usually got a job offer after 2-3 interviews. However, I got nothing after 7 on-site interviews from different companies. It occurred to me that my interview skills were not good enough. Then I searched online and found Cathy. I felt very comfortable working with her. She was very encouraging, sharp and professional.

What I learnt from her was that a lot of little things I did not pay attention to could have caused damage to me. I just did not know. If Cathy had not pointed it out, I may never know. With her help, I was able to improve performance at the interview and eventually got two offers from prestigious companies within three weeks.

Of course, interview coaching cannot guarantee you a job offer. You have to have most, if not all qualifications required by the position. But I believe Cathy would help you maximize your chance to get the offer.  I got a new job after coaching with Cathy!

Getting a job is probably one of the most important things in your life. Seeking an interview coach is much more efficient and helpful than reading books or watching videos online. I suggest you contact Cathy if you are not sure about your interview skills.   Jing W, Millbrae, Pharmacologist

“Cathy Morrey is a fantastic Coach Interview and Life Coach! She possesses an incredible gift of being able to zero in on the root causes behind whatever it is that his holding you up/back – even if you are not quite aware of what it is yourself. She is amazingly insightful and extremely direct, yet gentle – she is very supportive, yet holds you accountable so that you achieve your goals- she’s a very powerful force.”

-Dana Thomas, Paralegal

"Cathy has the HIGHEST integrity and works EXTREMELY well with her clients. She gets to the cause of your upsets and breakdowns with laser precision and gets you back in action like never before! Power and passion is her trademark. You get 200% more than you can ever imagine. You don't hire Cathy, you get your life back, you get your mind straight and you get results.... Cathy exudes Love, Life & Happiness!!!!"
-Frank McCue, Real Estate Broker
 
 
Not every interviewer will ask you every one of these questions.  However, if you are prepared to address these questions, you will leave the impression that you were prepared for your job interview, even if additional questions take you by surprise. Below are a few common interview questions.

What the interview is looking for:

Interviewer says: Tell me about yourself.

Remember, this is a job interview, not a psychological or personal interview. The interviewer is interested in the information about you that relates to your qualifications for employment, such as education, work experiences and extracurricular activities.  Use this question as an opportunity to tell a short story about yourself that describes the values you have and why you think they are important for the job.

Interviewer says: What do you expect to be doing five years from now?

The interviewer is looking for evidence of career goals and ambitions rather than minutely specific descriptions. The interviewer wants to see your thought process and the criteria that are important to you. The interviewer is not looking for information about your personal life.

Interviewer says: Why should I hire you?

Don’t make vague statements here. Show them that you have done your research by highlighting what problems they are facing. Then, provide specific examples of how you’re the right person to help solve those problems. Give them proof of your value and your answer will come across as clear, concise, and confident. Show them that you are passionate about the work and their company.

Interviewer says: What are your strengths? Only mention strengths that you can back up with clear proof. Prove your strengths with numbers and percentages, not generalized statements.

Interviewer says: What are your weaknesses?

This question is tricky for everyone. If you've done your research, you know what weaknesses would be unacceptable in the job, and you probably haven't made it to the interview stage if you have those weaknesses. If you say that you “work too hard” then no one takes the answer seriously, but if you say a real weakness then you look like a bad candidate.  Don't be dishonest and don't make up something that you think sounds good. Don't respond with a joke (that's just evading the question).Don't discuss topics that are personal in nature (like having a messy bedroom at home).

Don't be surprised by or unprepared for this question. It may be asked in other ways, such as "What would your greatest challenge be if you were in this job?"

In the best circumstance, the employer is asking this question to discern your self-awareness. We all have strengths and weaknesses.

There are a few strategies you can use to prepare:
1. Identify a weakness that you are working to correct and talk about how you are doing this.
2. Identify a weaknesses that is not relevant to the job. 
3. Show how you seek out and work well with others who have strengths in your areas of weakness.
4. Use your knowledge of your personality, showing both sides of the coin (pros and cons) making sure this is a match for the job. 

For example, if you have an introversion preference, AND the job requires solitary work, you can explain that you are energized by solitary work and have the stamina for it, while you may feel less energy from long periods of time working with customers (and obviously you would not say this if interviewing for a job that required long hours of customer contact). Balance that by explaining that you are always well-prepared for customer contacts, due to your workstyle and personality. 

For another example, you could say “Finance isn’t really my thing. I understand the big picture of profit and revenue, but small details and the mechanics of how it works — that’s just not how my mind works. So I would say that’s a weakness, but it’s also a reason I’m applying for this job in marketing. I know that it leverages my strengths and steers clear of some of the weaknesses.”

Interviewer says: Why do you want to work for our company/organization?  This is where you show that you did your research. Tell them what you know about the company, about the challenges they face and the opportunities they have, and how you fit in well with that overall picture.

Not having an answer is a good way to get crossed off the candidate list, and is a common pet peeve of interviewers. Research the employer before your interview; attempt to find out about the organization's products, locations, clients, philosophy, goals, previous growth record and growth plans, how they value employees and customers, etc.

Unfortunately it's very common for job-seekers to directly state, "I really want to work for your company/agency/organization/firm," but then to be unable to answer the question "why?" Without the answer to "why?" the initial statement becomes meaningless.  Why are you passionate about this company?  Why are you passionate about this position? How do your values match the values you will need to do your job? If the company sees that you LOVE the job, you will stand out from the rest. 

If you are ready to jump in and do what it takes to land a job, then contact Job Interview Services today.  We can help you!
 
 
 You have been called for a second interview. Congratulations!  That’s a great sign that a potential employer is interested in you. But it doesn’t mean you have secured the job, yet. You are likely one of two to three candidates asked to return for a follow-up interview, so don’t let down your guard.

A second interview may involve the same people you met during the first interview, and will undoubtedly involve additional people – your supervisor's boss, the president or division manager, potential coworkers, etc. You may meet with these people in a panel or individually. Each person will be assessing you on the following points:
-
Can you do the job?
-
Do you fit with our culture?
-
Does our team want to work with you?
-
Are you someone the hiring manager can manage? 

Be someone your potential manager and coworkers can imagine interacting with on a daily basis.

The more you invest in preparing for a second interview, the better positioned you will be to stand out from your competition and convince a prospective employer that YOU are the right person for the job.

Here’s how to prepare:

ANTICIPATE MORE INTENSE QUESTIONING

Second interview questions will delve more deeply into your knowledge, skills, and experiences, and how qualified you are for the position. The interviewers will also be gauging your interest in the position and company, as well as assessing how much you learned during the first interview. Prepare to answer questions such as “What have you learned about us so far?” and “How would you proceed if you were hired into this job?” Share how your background and expertise relates to the company’s challenges.

Review what you learned from your first interview about the position, the company, its products and services, and any challenges facing the person who gets the position. Study any business terms that were discussed – company product names, technologies
they use, competitors’ products/services, etc.

Review the organization’s website and any articles you can find on them. Consider how you would approach the job if hired. Also, continue to prepare stories of your past accomplishments, making sure they relate specifically to the job for which you are interviewing. You want to encourage confidence in your skills and abilities and reaffirm how closely they match the position’s and company’s needs.

PREPARE FOR A BEHAVIORAL INTERVIEW

Behavioral interview questions are designed to assess your future performance based on how you handled specific past situations, and are common during second interviews. Questions that begin with,“Tell me about a time when...” or “Describe a situation in which...” may be asked.  It will be important to familiarize yourself with this interview style and prepare your answers to these potential questions to ensure you do well on the second interview.  Practice answering using the STAR method (describe situation, task, action you took and the result). 

ASK INSIGHTFUL QUESTIONS

During the first interview, you asked questions that indicated your interest in the job and reflected your knowledge of the company and its products. In a second interview, it’s imperative to build on this impression by asking more insightful questions, such as what you will be accountable for achieving in the first 3-6 months, how this position interacts with other departments in the company, and what the company’s plans for the future are. It is not yet time to ask about salary or benefits, unless HR or the hiring manager has already broached these subjects. Instead, focus on issues relative to performing the job effectively.

DEMONSTRATE THAT YOU ARE A TEAM PLAYER

Second interviews are often used to determine if you will “fit” into the organization or with other members of the team. Chemistry plays a crucial role in hiring decisions, so you’ll want to be sure to put your best foot forward. Make sure you’re conveying your success stories and expertise in an articulate and concise fashion.  At the same time, be enthusiastic and easy to talk with. Maintain good eye contact with your interviewers and smile when appropriate. 

SHOW ENTHUSIASM FOR THE JOB

A second interview can be a long ordeal, sometimes lasting an entire day, and can be draining for even the most energetic of interviewers. Although you may find yourself tiring as the interview goes on, do everything you can to remain upbeat and interested in the job. If you’re in need of a break, ask if you can use the restroom so you can take some deep breaths and rejuvenate. Be prepared to answer the question, “Why do you want to work for us?” and continue to convey your enthusiastic interest in the job.

SEND THANK YOU LETTERS

As after a first interview, it is imperative you send a thank you letter to each of the people you interviewed with within 24 hours of the second interview. A well written thank you letter gives you an additional opportunity to “sell” the company on your skills and expertise. 

MAKE SURE THE JOB FITS YOU

Although your primary goal is to convince your interviewers that you are right for their company, another critical component of the second interview is your own evaluation of whether the job and company are a right fit for you. Where your first interview introduced you to the job, the company, and some of the players, a second interview will allow you to better assess the job responsibilities, the hiring manager’s style, the company’s culture, and the dynamics between the people hiring you. This is the time to ask questions that will help you get a better sense of whether this is an opportunity that excites you and whether the job will make use of your greatest strengths and abilities.

 
 
Below are potential questions that might be asked of current or recent college graduates.

Not every interviewer will ask you every one of these questions.  However, if you are prepared to address these questions, you will leave the impression that you were prepared for your job interview, even if additional questions take you by surprise.

• What are your long-range goals and objectives for the next seven to ten years?

• What are your short-range goals and objectives for the next one to three years?

• How do you plan to achieve your career goals?

• What are the most important rewards you expect in your career?

• Why did you choose the career for which you are preparing?

• What are your strengths, weaknesses, and interests?

• How do you think a friend or professor who knows you well would describe you?

• Describe a situation in which you had to work with a difficult person (another student, co-worker, customer, supervisor, etc.). How did you handle the situation? Is there anything you would have done differently in hindsight?

• What motivates you to put forth your greatest effort? Describe a situation in which you did so.

• In what ways have your college experiences prepared you for a career?

• How do you determine or evaluate success?

• In what ways do you think you can make a contribution to our organization?

• Describe a contribution you have made to a project on which you worked.

• What qualities should a successful manager/leader/supervisor/etc. possess?

• Was there an occasion when you disagreed with a supervisor's decision or company policy? Describe how you handled the situation.

• What two or three accomplishments have given you the most satisfaction? Why?

• Describe your most rewarding college experience.

• What interests you about our product or service?

• Why did you select your college or university?

• What led you to choose your major or field of study?

• What college subjects did you like best? Why?

• What college subjects did you like least? Why?

• If you could do so, how would you plan your academic studies differently?

• Do you think your grades are a good indication of your academic achievement?

• What have you learned from participation in extracurricular activities?

• In what kind of work environment are you most comfortable?

• How do you work under pressure?

• Describe a situation in which you worked as part of a team. What role did you take on? What went well and what didn't?

• In what part-time, co-op, or summer jobs have you been most interested? Why?

• How would you describe the ideal job for you following graduation?

• Why did you decide to seek a position with our organization?

• What two or three things would be most important to you in your job?

• What criteria are you using to evaluate the organization for which you hope to work?

• How would you view needing to relocate for the job? Do you have any constraints on relocation?

• Are you comfortable with the amount of travel this job requires?

• Are you willing to spend at least six months as a trainee?

Better questions are not those that can be answered with a "yes" or "no," but are open-ended questions that invite thoughtful response. Even if you are asked a question that can be answered with a "yes" or "no," (e.g. "Are you comfortable with the amount of travel this job involves?"), you can certainly add a word of explanation to back up your answer (e.g., "Yes. I actually look forward to the opportuntity to travel and to work with the staff members in some of the other offices.)

What the interview is looking for:

Interviewer says: Tell me about yourself.

Remember, this is a job interview, not a psychological or personal interview. The interviewer is interested in the information about you that relates to your qualifications for employment, such as education, work experiences and extracurricular activities.

Interviewer says: What do you expect to be doing five years from now?

The interviewer is looking for evidence of career goals and ambitions rather than minutely specific descriptions. The interviewer wants to see your thought process and the criteria that are important to you. The interviewer is not looking for information about your personal life.

Interviewer says: Why should I hire you?

Stress what you have to offer the employer as relates to the position for which you are interviewing, not how nice it would be to work there or what you want from the employer. Remember that you are being compared to other candidates, and in fact more than one candidate might be a very good employee. Deliver to the employer reasons to see that you are a good fit (show you know yourself, know the field/industry, know the organization, and know the position).

Interviewer says: What are your weaknesses?

This question is tricky for everyone. If you've done your research, you know what weaknesses would be unacceptable in the job, and you probably haven't made it to the interview stage if you have those weaknesses.

Don't be dishonest and don't make up something that you think sounds good. Don't respond with a joke (that's just evading the question).

Don't discuss topics that are personal in nature (like having a messy kitchen at home).

Don't be surprised by or unprepared for this question. It may be asked in other ways, such as "What would your greatest challenge be if you were in this job?"

In the best circumstance, the employer is asking this question to discern your self-awareness. We all have strengths and weaknesses.

There are a few strategies you can use to prepare:
1. Identify a weakness that you are working to correct and talk about how you are doing this.
2. Identify a weaknesses that is not relevant to the job.
3. Show how you seek out and work well with others who have strengths in your areas of weakness.
4. Use your knowledge of your personality, showing both sides of the coin (pros and cons) making sure this is a match for the job. For example, if you have an introversion preference, AND the job requires solitary work, you can explain that you are energized by solitary work and have the stamina for it, while you may feel less energy from long periods of time working with customers (and obviously you would not say this if interviewing for a job that required long hours of customer contact). Balance that by explaining that you are always well-prepared for customer contacts, due to your workstyle and personality.

Interviewer says: What are your ideas about salary?

Research salaries in your field before your interviews so that you know the current salary range for the type of position you are seeking.

Interviewer says: Why do you want to work for our company/organization?

Not having an answer is a good way to get crossed off the candidate list, and is a common pet peeve of interviewers. Research the employer before your interview; attempt to find out about the organization's products, locations, clients, philosophy, goals, previous growth record and growth plans, how they value employees and customers, etc.

Unfortunately it's very common for job-seekers to directly state, "I really want to work for your company/agency/organization/firm," but then to be unable to answer the question "why?" Without the answer to "why?" the initial statement becomes meaningless.

To go to the Job Interview Services Home page, click here.

 
 
IS your dream to become a cop?  Don’t eliminate YOURSELF because you make a stupid mistake on the Police Interview!

 Nobody wants to be that person…the one who got a shot at living their dream and blew it.

Think about how long you’ve wanted to be a police officer. Probably all your life, right? If you’re like me and most of the cops I know, this is something you’ve wanted to do since you were a little kid.

I bet you’ve spent years reading about police work and watching every re-run of “COPS” on TV. You’ve probably talked to police officers about the job, studied it at school, worked out every day and taken a ton of self-defense classes, all so you would be ready when you finally landed your police job.

Everybody that you know has heard about how you want to be a police officer…it’s your plan for your entire life.

So what in the world would be worse than acing the written exam, smoking the competition on the physical ability test…and then completely choking on the police oral interview because you didn’t know what to expect?

Don't let this happen to you.   


Discover rarely shared police interview techniques, tactics and strategies that will amaze the interview board and send your name right to the top of the hiring list!

"Job Interview Services" recommends an "Police Oral Board Interview Secrets." 
 You’ll get your money back if you aren’t happy!

Click here to purchase or to find out more about the package!
 
 
Women revolutionized the workforce by entering professions in record numbers, but many stepped off the career track to care for their families. Now, these same women are forging new career paths by proving that they can return to challenging, meaningful careers after a break, and so can you. Back on the Career Track shows you how they are doing it and helps you learn from their successes and challenges. Step-by-step exercises, inspiring stories, sample resumes, and resource lists round out this engaging, well-researched look at when, how, and why women are returning to work after career breaks of a few months or many years. It offers the perfect first step and a handy resource to regularly reference as you successfully relaunch your own career.  “For those who say you can’t go back, this book is the definitive rebuttal.” —BusinessWeek “Cohen and Rabin have hit the nail on the head with this thorough, well-written, step-by-step relaunch guide for stay-at-home moms.” —Library Journal (starred review) "This is a must-read before filling out any job applications, and it will become your go-to resource each step of the way.” —Mom Central Book Reviews “Finally! A smart, practical, inspiring guide for moms looking to get back to paid work—without losing their minds.” —Leslie Morgan Steiner, editor of Mommy Wars.  


Click on the "Back on the Career Track" book below to purchase!   To go back to this website after clicking on the book below, please click the back button. 
 
 
Businesses need experienced people who know other cultures, have a desire to learn, are motivated, speak another language, and are willing to move around. 

It was only a couple of years go that taking a year off was considered a bad move for your career, but now, it’s often considered a career boost- a sign of independence, motivation, and ambition. Employers won’t toss your resume anymore because of a gap year.

But how do you turn that year into tangible experience to showcase in a resume?

1. Don’t put everything on your résumé 90% of your travels aren’t really “experience,” but soft skills you picked up on the road: people skills, confidence, and independence. 

2. It’s not the resume, it’s the cover letter! Your travels are a story and the details don’t translate well as bullet points on a resume. Talk about them in the cover letter, where you can give more detail. A well written cover letter that includes travel experience can often make you look really good!

Explain why you left, what your experience taught you, and how it makes you a better employee. This is also where you want to mention those “soft skills,” as they require more detail than a simple bullet point expression. Discuss your travels in depth here using only a small section of the resume as support.

.3. Step by step instructions for articulating your experience.  


Step One: Be honest.  Many people put their trip under work experience, but since it’s not work, it’s not work experience. At the bottom of your resume, create a section called “Other Experience” and title it “(Your Name) Gap Year” and include the dates.

Step Two: Pick tangible skills. Skills that translate into any job. Like everything on a resume, this will be all about how you word things. Choose your wording carefully. For example:

Haggled and saved hundreds of dollars in art work traveling across the World.   Negotiation Skills.

Planned, financed, and organized your trip? Stayed under budget by $1000 for over 6 months when traveling to Peru.  Budgeting and Planning.

Got stuck in a jungle at night because I explored off the trail? Self-reliance and independence.

You get the idea. It’s all about wording your experience correctly. Notice how those are all skills you can use in the business world. I didn’t put any of those “soft skills” down.

Writing “I’m good with people” is generic and makes you sound like you are using "buzz words". Choose only job related “hard” skills for the resume because what you are doing is showing how your life experience makes up for your lack of practical experience.

Step Three: Know your audience! Only put travel on your resume if it helps explain an extended work gap (i.e. a year or longer), is relevant to the job, or unique. If all you did was live in Mexico and got drunk then it is useless filler that will only hurt you. If you volunteered in a village in Cambodia, then keep it on. If this job requires extended travel, definitely put it here.

So what would this all look like? Here’s how I would put it on my resume.

Other Experience


John's Gap Year 2008-2009
  • Cultivated language and communication skills through contact with people from around the world. Learned to use non verbal and verbal communication to overcome communication and language barriers.
  • Learned how to adapt to unanticipated situations and improvise new plans due to periodic travel mishaps and unexpected events.
  • Developed budgeting and planning skills by financing, planning, organizing my year around the world. This involved using various spreadsheets and keeping a record of expenses.
  • Developed negotiation skills through daily contact with sellers in markets and vendors throughout Mexico.
That sounds professional, actionable, and tangible. It explains each skill and how I developed it. Remember that the employer is going to ask you to explain these points just like they would any other part of your resume.

It’s important you have anecdotes supporting each bullet point, especially since these have no boss to confirm any of this- just your word. If you can’t explain it well, keep it off.
Use your travel experience to differentiate yourself. That’s why in the beginning, I said put it in the cover letter. It allows you more time to explain the story behind it. Good luck!

 
 
Steve Jobs is very inspiring.  Listen to Steve as he shares how your work is going to fill a large part of your life, and the only way to be truly satisfied is to do what you believe is great work. Steve says that the only way to do great work is to love what you do. If you haven't found it yet, keep looking. Don't settle.